The Other Side of the Gate

The Other Side of the Gate

The Other Side of the Gate (Into the Realms #1) by Craig Michael Curtis

Published: July 28, 2009

Fourteen year old Daniel Weaver arrives in a strange new world called the Realms one night by boat. He doesn’t know where he is or how he got there. He is not the first human to come there, nor will he be the last. He meets a local girl named Eleanor,  and together decide to travel through the sixteen Gates of the Realms on a “forward quest” in order to find out the truth about why humans have been coming to the Realms. Come explore the world of the Realms, and join Daniel and Eleanor as they begin their epic coming of age quest. Recommended for ages 14+, 4 stars. 

First I will discuss the things I didn’t like about the book. There were some obvious spelling errors and typos. The two spaces at the end of each sentence bothered me in the beginning, but I didn’t care so much about by the end of the book, probably because I got used to it. The biggest issue with the book, in my opinion, was the way the story dragged in the middle and end, and I felt like it could’ve been edited down a bit to help with that problem. 

On to the good stuff. I really liked the world-building in this book. I also liked the idea of getting a “Realm gift” from the prime-numbered Realms and a “power word,” which gives you another superhero-like power. The main character is transported to an unknown world and must survive by his wits and skills. He is good at helping people and encouraging them. Daniel meets Eleanor in a bit of an odd way, but they hit it off right away. I love both of these characters, and they really compliment each other. Their awkwardness as they start to fall for each other is adorable, the boy is a bit clueless and the girl is more forward (just like it usually goes in real life, at least in my experience). My favorite characters were the soul-bound couple, the Butterfields, because of the way they interact with each other – just like an old married couple even though they’re not. The most surprising character that I enjoyed reading about was Oka, the curmudgeon would-be wizard, who reluctantly helps Daniel and Eleanor at the end of the book. My favorite scene was probably the static electricity scene at the end of the book with the ghosts (can’t go into more or it will ruin it for everyone else). 

The end of the book especially had a Wizard of Oz theme to it, which I enjoyed as L. Frank Baum is one of my favorite authors. Think about the story summary: Two, and eventually four, teenagers go on a quest to seek knowledge and the help of a wizard. They finally find their wizard, who is actually not one (just like in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz), and is conveniently named Harry Baum. Daniel doesn’t exactly find the answers he is looking for in the Fourth Realm with his “magician” and so needs to continue all the way to the end to find his reason for being in the Realms. 

Bottom line for this book, and the series in general: Yes it is a long book but well worth a read and I personally am excited to see what he does with the next book in the five book series. 

Disclaimer: I did receive a copy of this book from the author in exchange for my honest review. 

 

Advertisements

Heroine Worship

Heroine Worship

Heroine Worship (Heroine Complex #2) by Sarah Kuhn

Published July 4, 2017

Aveda Jupiter, badass superheroine extraordinaire, is bored. Ever since she and her best friend (and former personal assistant) fire-wielder Evie Tanaka stopped a demon invasion four months earlier, Ms. Jupiter (aka Annie Chang) has been frustrated with the lack of opportunities for superheroine intervention in San Francisco, but also because no one takes her seriously and everyone thinks she is just a attention-hogging diva. She wants to be an exemplary best friend to Evie, and so when Evie gets engaged and asks her to be the maid of honor, she takes her job very seriously. Things finally start happening with Scott, the mage who works with her company, and Annie has been in love with him forever. Only the damn demons seem to keep getting in the way of everything. Can Evie and Aveda set aside their difference and work together to defeat these demons? 3-1/2 stars. 

This book draggggggggged a lot, especially in the middle. I kept waiting for the plot to progress and it did eventually, but took its sweet time to get there. If I didn’t like the characters so much, I probably wouldn’t have finished it. The first book in the series, Heroine Complex, was entirely from the viewpoint of Evie and I really sympathized with her for having deal with someone who never appreciated her and what she did for her boss/friend. This book is entirely from Annie/Aveda’s viewpoint, which is completely different. We find out pretty early on that Annie is not the overly-confident diva that she originally appears but is completely vulnerable and emotional, especially after she realizes what a complete b**** she’s been to her best friend over the years. Then there’s Scott, the mage she’s known for years who she has had a crush on since she was twelve years old, and who has only recently started acting like a normal human being with her. I loved the interaction between the two of them and how shy they were as they got to know each other again, properly this time. 

Disclaimer: I received this book, from Berkley Publishing Group via Netgalley, in exchange for my honest review. 

 

Heroine Complex

Heroine Complex

Heroine Complex (Heroine Complex #1) by Sarah Kuhn

To be published: July 5, 2016

Ever since the demons started coming out of inter-dimensional portals eight years ago, Aveda Jupiter has been San Francisco’s on-call heroine. She loves kicking butt, taking names and collecting all the fame and attention that goes with it. Evie Tanaka is her long-suffering personal assistant (and best friend) who very much prefers to be behind the scenes organizing Aveda’s schedule and handling her tantrums. Lucy, a martial arts instructor and bodyguard, and Nate, a demon scientist and physician make up the rest of Aveda’s team. Staying in the shadows is hard for Evie when she also has to be the caregiver for her unruly teenage sister Bea. To top it off, her boss is injured after a demon fight and Evie must take her place, and her secret powers emerge.  On top of that, she finds herself in a very unexpected romance with a co-worker. She suddenly realizes that being a superhero isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Can she figure out how to handle her superpowers, her love life, her boss and best friend and her sister, all while trying to save the world from a demon invasion. To find out, read the exciting first book of the Heroine Complex series! 4 stars. 

I honestly thought this was a Young Adult book until I picked it up and discovered the prodigious use of the the F-bomb in the beginning (the content/storytelling style makes it more New Adult). My only gripe with it was the beginning didn’t really grab my attention like I was hoping and I had to kind of force my way through it. Once the story got going however, it was great. I picked this one up because it’s about kick-ass Asian heroines, which is something you don’t see too often, and I love a good multicultural superhero story. The book reminded of the TV show Buffy the Vampire Slayer, in the feisty-heroine- fights-demons-with-her-assorted-talented-friends-and-hunky-love-interest kind of way. I loved Evie’s character and the way she fell in love with the guy that always annoyed her but turns out she has a secret crush on. I’m sure this has happened to pretty much everyone at some point in their life (I know it has for me). Nate was totally the hot nerdy guy I always seem to fall for. I completely was not expecting the twist at the end of the story, but it definitely made for some interesting reading. So if you are looking for a fun light read with snarky humor about awesome heroines,  nerdy references and guys, karaoke contests, and a touch of romance and sex, then this is definitely the book for you.

 

Cinder

Cinder

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer, narrated by Rebecca Soler

Cinder is a cyborg (half machine/half 16 yr old teenage girl) living in New Beijing, in a futuristic post-World-War-IV world. She’s a droid mechanic and is visited by Kai, the handsome young prince of the Eastern province, so she can repair his android as it is “of the highest importance.” There seems to be a back story there, but Cinder is not able to determine it at the time, as she is overwhelmed by the fact the prince came to her stall. This is especially  true after the plague, called letumosis, breaks out in the bakery across the street and Cinder must flee the area. After her step-sister Peony catches the plague, Cinder is racked with guilt and her truly evil stepmother volunteers her as a test subject to find a cure for the virus. There is the threat of war from the mind-controlling glamour-using Lunar Queen Lavana which has all the world leaders, Prince Kai included, worried. Will Cinder survive the plague and find out the truth about her past? To find out, read the awesome start of The Lunar Chronicles. Highly recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars.

This book has been on my to-read list forever, so I finally took the plunge and got a copy. I am glad I did because I really enjoyed this sci-fi dystopian fairy-tale interpretation of the classic Cinderella. The narrator, Rebecca Soler, was quite good at differentiating between all the different characters and personalities (great performance). I love that the premise of the book is accepting people who are different and even loving them for it or perhaps despite the difference. The world-building was fantastic and the author really sucks your into the book from the beginning. The story is kind of hard to summarize especially when you start with “Imagine a retelling of the Cinderella where the heroine is a cyborg,” and most people don’t quite know what to think about it. But it was really easy to root for Cinder as her life did suck and meeting Prince Kai and everything that happens after really does change her life, for good or ill. Plus Prince Kai…sigh, sounds so dreamy. I kind of picture him like the sweet popular guy Kazahaya in the From Me to You anime:

Kimi Ni Todoke - From Me to You

I mean it’s obvious early on that Prince Kai digs Cinder, but she is so convinced that he is mistaken because she is a cyborg (probably because she’s always been treated like crap by her adopted mother and the older step-sister), though of course he doesn’t know that until much later. The scene in the elevator when he asks her for the second time to go to the ball with him was adorable as was her reaction. And I thought I was gonna scream (in a good way) when he brings her the present on his Coronation Day. In fact, this book made me very emotional (mostly joy though a little bit of spite for the severely evil characters, in the form or Audri and Queen Levana). Aside from Cinder, my favorite characters were Iko and Dr. Erland (even though he was a bit off in the beginning of the book, he more than made up for it in the end). I look forward to reading the next one very soon!