Kamisama Kiss, Vol 25

Kamisama Kiss Vol 25

Kamisama Kiss Vol 25 written and illustrated by Julietta Suzuki

To be published: Oct 3, 2017

Nanami has been studying hard the last ten months and finally got accepted into Junior College in the Dept of Early Childhood Education, so she can work with kids. But she is wary of marrying Tomoe, and still doesn’t really want to leave the shrine and stop being the human kami. Kotaro, the human love of Himemiko, the fish yokai, that Nanami helped out in the beginning of the series, is gravely ill. Kotaro seeks her help. It turns out Himemiko is pregnant with Kotaro’s child and her people are not happy that the child is human. Himemiko wanted Nanami to come to her palace and get married to Tomoe so that her subjects would relent about her wanting to marry Kotaro, and see that a yokai marrying a human is perfectly normal. So Tomoe finally proposes and she says yes! They are getting married at Mikage shrine, and invite all their friends.  Will they finally get their happily ever after? To find out, read the heartwarming conclusion to the Kamisama Kiss series! Recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars. 

I am sad that this is the last volume in the series, but I figured it was coming soon as they can only drag the Tomoe-is-still-stuck-in-the-body-of-a-fox for so long. I love Tomoe but I kind of prefer Jiro, the tengu chieftan,  for her even if he is a grumpy bastard. Hehe on that whole “you’re too tempting a sight tonight” comment. I loved it, even though the way she went about it was rather odd, when Himemiko kidnapped Nanami and dressed her in the traditional all-white wedding kimono. Nanami didn’t really want to get married probably because of what happened with her parents, but the look of pure joy when she put that wedding dress on and saw how beautiful she looked, was priceless. Not to mention the look on Tomoe’s face when he first sees her and the way he hugged her on their wedding day. I liked Ami being brave and finally talking to Kurama and told him how she felt about him. 

Disclaimer: I received this ARC, from Viz Media, in exchange for my honest review. 

 

The Demon Prince of Momochi House, Vol 10

The Demon Prince of Momochi House Volume 10

The Demon Prince of Momochi House, Vol. 10 written and illustrated by Aya Shouoto

To be published: Oct 3, 2017

Himari Momochi is still in shock after Aoi’s love confession. She goes exploring the house on her own and almost gets kidnapped by a female ayakashi (or what is left of it), only to be rescued by the Guardian of the Gate between the spiritual and human worlds, who she met a few volumes before. He wants the power in her last name now and decides at first that the best way to do that is to marry her, which she of course refuses, then decides that becoming the guardian of the Momochi House (the omamori-sama) would be the better route. Aoi also completely refuses to allow either of these things to happen, but the Guardian forces his hand by kidnapping Himari and forcing him to play a dangerous game to get her back. Aoi thankfully wins but at what cost to Himari and himself? Bonus story about Ise included at the end. Recommended for ages 14+, 4 stars. 

Mangas like this crack me up. This book is basically a reverse harem, a manga where the main character is a girl who has a bevy of hot young men that are falling over themselves to get her attention and/or protect her. The Guardian of the Gate is handsome and charming, and it seems used to getting his own way, but is defeated using his own vanity/bad habits in the end. Bit poetic if you think about it. Aoi, despite looking exactly the same, seems to have changed and become more powerful/ruthless since he revealed his true feelings for Himari. And that scene where the Guardian gets all cheeky and kisses Himari and you see Aoi literally crack and turn into the bloodthirsty Nue, is pretty bad-ass. I was honestly a little confused about what exactly happened with the new shikigami at the end of the manga, so hopefully the author/illustrator will explain it better in the next volume. 

Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this manga from Viz Media in exchange for my honest review. 

Norse Mythology

norsemythology_hardback_1473940163

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Published: February 7, 2017

Taken from Goodreads.com: In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people. Gaiman stays true to the myths while vividly reincarnating Odin, the highest of the high, wise, daring, and cunning; Thor, Odin’s son, incredibly strong yet not the wisest of gods; and Loki, the son of giants, a trickster and unsurpassable manipulator. From Gaiman’s deft and witty prose emerges the gods with their fiercely competitive natures, their susceptibility to being duped and to dupe others, and their tendency to let passion ignite their actions, making these long-ago myths breathe pungent life again.

I’ve never had the opportunity to advance read one of Mr. Gaiman’s books, so I jumped at the chance when I saw it on Netgalley. Plus it’s about one of my favorite subjects that I have loved since a child, and I could identify with Mr. Gaiman’s similar experience, in regards to the introduction of Norse mythology into his life, in the foreword. His writing is beautiful as it always is and I discovered stories I had never heard before, but I guess I just thought it would be different and a better interpretation because of his past work involving Norse mythology (Odd and the Frost Giants and American Gods). 3-1/2 stars. 

Disclaimer: I received a copy from the publishers, WW. Norton & Company on Netgalley, in exchange for my honest review. 

Summer Manga

This summer has been cray-cray! So much work and programming and personal life has been all over the place. So I have been reading a good amount of manga (29 and counting since end of April) this summer in between all the ARCs and book club reads because A. I enjoy them B. they are quick reads C. sometimes you just need something fluffy to read in between all the other stuff. I have discovered some pretty good stuff by accident, though some I knew about because of watching the anime version. I was very surprised how deep and meaningful A Silent Voice ended up being, and it is definitely one of the best mangas I’ve read this year. I’ve read more than I have reviewed, but I’ve been writing this post forever, so I figured I should end it soon. 

Strobe Edge Vol 1

Strobe Edge, Vol 1. written and illustrated by Io Sakisaka

Honestly at first I thought this book was a bit shallow and the main character clueless, but I will admit that is a bit of the charm of the book. Ninako has always relied on others to tell how she was feeling and has always been very nice but naive, which is why when she falls for the quiet popular guy Ren, she doesn’t know how to react. She wasn’t expecting it and most of her interactions with him are purely by luck and circumstance, but both of them seem to be falling in love with each other in a most unexpected way. Of course, there is another boy named Daichi who is in love with her, and they have been friends for years, but won’t say anything except to get pissed at Ren for “taking her away” from him. The twist in this story comes from the fact that Ren is dating Daichi’s older sister and his family has been going through a messy divorce. Will she bow to her friend’s pressure to date Daishi or follow her heart (though possibly have it broken) by pursuing Ren? Recommended for ages 13+, 3 stars. 

A Silent Voice #1 -2 by Yoshitoki Oima

A-Silent-Voice-Koe-no-Katachi-Volume-2

Shoya Ishida is a bit of a ruffian and slacker. He is in 6th grade and with the help of his two buddies, they make a new girl’s life a living hell. Shoko Nishimiya is the object of his torture, a pretty deaf girl who thinks the best of everyone, even in the midst of being harangued constantly by Shoya. He ends up ruining six of Shoko’s hearing aids before her mother draws her out of school, and charges his mother for the replacement of them, all $17,000 worth. Because of what he did, Shoya is ostracized for the next 6 years by his classmates and supposed friends and becomes an outcast. He makes up his mind to find Shoko and apologize to her in person, after he has paid back his mother all the money he owes her. He finally meets her and instead of simply apologizing, he tries to become her friend. She is at first bewildered by this, but kind of accepts it at the same time. He does seem like he’s turned over a new leaf, paying his mom back for the money he owes her, trying to help Shoko out, and learning sign language so they can communicate. Her sister Yuzuru is very protective of her and at first pretends to be her boyfriend to scare off Shoya (which leads to a hilarious scene in a public bath later on). In the end, Yuzuru decides that he is not being false and is sincerely trying to make amends. Their mother, however, will never forgive him. Will Shoya ever be able to get her mother’s forgiveness? What is his end game? How does Shoko really feel about him? To find out, read the first two volumes of this delightful series. Highly recommended for ages 13+, 5 stars. 

I forget what I was browsing when I discovered this title, but I’m glad I picked it up. The subject matter was so interesting and one I’ve never seen in mangas before, at least in this context. This handled some pretty tough topics such as bullying, depression, and thoughts of suicide, with a light touch. By that, I mean we are clearly shown the cause of the main character’s issues and the effect it had on his life afterwards (without being heavy-handed). I have dealt with all three of those in the past and been on both sides of bullying and I thought it was written very well. I think my favorite part had to be his mother’s reaction to finding out that he planned to end his life (as a mother, I can understand her reaction). 

Demon Love Spell

Demon Love Spell (Ayakashi Koi Emaki), Vol. 1-4 written and illustrated by Manyu Shinjo

This is quite possibly one of the worst name for a manga or anime, or really a book period. However, the story really wasn’t that bad. A good girl falling in love for a bad boy is not a new story, but watching her crumble was entertaining. Definitely a 16+ book though, as there are fairly graphic depiction of nudity and simulations of sex.

Miko Tsubaki is daughter of the head priest of the local shrine and her father is a famous demon hunter. She is supposed to be following in this footsteps, but her powers aren’t as good. One day she seals the powers of an incredibly powerful incubus (who seduces women into having sex with them to gain their power or energy) named Kagura, totally by accident, and they start living together. He is in a much different form though, not the sex god form she originally encounters but a mini boy child version (which makes for some interesting scenes). Eventually, Kagura proposes marriage to her and she says yes, only they have to convince both of their families it is a good idea. 

Volume 4 was my favorite one of the series because it made me laugh out loud so much I must’ve seemed like a crazy person.The series as a whole has been pretty hilarious as the incubus tries to get Miko, a priestess, to have sex with him so he can become even more powerful as a demon. But this volume is more stepped up as they are both falling more in love with each other and Miko’s resistance is falling fast. Plus every time she works up the courage to actually do it, they are interrupted by a crazy situation, aka the body swapping in this book.  Recommended for ages 16+, 4 stars. 

Wolf Children Ame and Yuki

Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki written by Mamoru Hosoda, illustrated by Yu and Yoshiyuki Sadamoto

I love love loved this book! It was a bit of a random pickup after I saw the book on a comics involving mothers booklist and thought it looked like fun. It was sweet and sad and wonderful! Plus fabulous illustrations that were so expressive. Hana is a young woman at university in a biology class when she meets a handsome but quiet young man and shares her textbook with him. They quickly fall in love, even after he reveals that he is half-wolf and can change at will. They soon have a baby girl named Yuki, followed a year later by a boy named Ame. Her husband has a tragic accident and dies, leaving young mother Hana to take care of two children by herself. She decides they would be able to be more themselves, aka half-wolf children, if they lived out in the country where her husband grew up. So they move way out and have to fend for themselves, learning to garden and be a part of nature. Her children are very different as they decide whether they want to be human or wolf on their own. Parts of this manga made me sob and it was totally heart-wrenching, but hopeful in the end. The anime version is great as well. Highly recommended for ages 15+, 5 stars.

Library Wars Vol 14

Library Wars: Love & War, Vol 14 written and illustrated by Kiiro Yumi

The Library Task Force (LTF) is still protecting the author Mr. Toma from the Media Betterment Committee guys aka the bad guys who want censorship, but decide he must defect from Japan to protect himself.  Kasahara and Instructor Dojo are helping Toma escape, but Dojo is injured and Kasahara must protect both of them from the MBC. Kasahara picks him up and takes him to safety. It finally happened! Kasahara finally got up the nerve to kiss Instructor Dojo after he is injured and tell him she likes him. He is shocked to say the least, but can still smirk at her as she is leaving. The LTF figured out that their mole was none other than Assistant Director Hatano and not Tezuka’s brother Satoshi. Dojo manages to make it a hospital where he has surgery to remove the bullet from his leg, and Kasahara drives Toma to Osaka. I liked it at the end of the manga when the LTF team members are discussing how similar Kasahara and Dojo are, and how Dojo used to be just like Kasahara when he first started. Highly recommended for ages 13+, 5 stars. 

Kimi Ni Todoke - From Me to You manga

Kimi ni Todoke (From Me to You), Vol 1- 10 written and illustrated by Karuho Shiina

I adore this series! I discovered the anime on Hulu and binge-watched it until the end, completely obsessed with it. So when I discovered there was also a manga, I jumped at the chance to read it. I am enjoying it because there is so much more in the manga that you don’t get in the anime show. Volume 1 is so adorable and I loved how the author/illustrator showed how Kazehaya was falling for her so early in the series instead of a bit later like they show in the anime. I mean he was nice to hear from the beginning but you don’t really see the love till later. Volume 1 is all about introducing us to the main characters and Sawako’s first year (1 of 3 years of Japanese high school). Sawako, who the teens have all dubbed Sadako (the long dark haired girl from the horror movie The Ring) because her behavior and mannerisms look the same, is a very quiet and shy girl with no friends. After a chance meeting with Kazehaya before school starts, she starts to slowly come out of her shell and try to get to know and befriend her classmates. They begin to see how cool she is and fun to be around. She becomes friends with Ayane and Chizuru, two girls who are the total opposite of her but soon become fiercely protective of each other. Because she is friends with Chizuru, she also befriends Ryu, Chizuru’s best friend (who is also secretly in love with her). With Kazehaya’s help, she is befriending more classmates and becoming well-liked with pretty much everyone, except Kurumi (who declares them rivals after she is rejected by Kazehaya). Then comes the incredibly slow burn romance between Sawako and Kazehaya culminating in a very awkward pronouncement from both of them that they like each other and start a relationship. I loved Ryu’s character even more in the manga, especially in relation to Chizuru. I can totally relate to Sawako as I was very shy in high school. Looking forward to reading more volumes in the series as this is pretty much where the anime stopped and I know there is at least 15 more volumes after that. Highly recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars. 

Kamisama Kiss Vol 20

Kamisama Kiss Vol. 20 written and illustrated by Julietta Suzuki

Namami and Tomoe are finally dating and they are in Okinawa for Nanami’s class trip. Mikage sends Tomoe on an errand to drop off a gift to the shrine maiden on an island nearby and Tomoe realizes it’s the same one he met so about 100 years ago. She tells him “the girl who lives in your heart is a good one,” and “you need to change if you want to make that girl happy.” He assumes that it means he must become human and starts reading up on it, but it really freaks Nanami out. Tomoe is kind of realizing how hard it will be to be a demon and have a human girlfriend, and she thinks he is rushing his decision to become human. Nanami goes to discuss things with Mikage who tries to make her see things through Tomoe’s eyes. Tomoe eventually takes the re-evolution potion that Kurama got from Ami (to turn her back to human after she was turned into a mermaid in the previous volume), and turns into a small white fox and then is stuck like that. Will he be able to turn back into a demon or even a human? To find out, read this exciting volume. Recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars. 

Demon Prince of Momochi House Vol 1     The Demon Prince of Momochi House

The Demon Prince of Momochi House, Vol 1-2 by Aya Shouoto

A fellow librarian recommended this series to me, so I decided to give it a try. I mean how can I not with a fox demon guy on the cover? They are a particular weakness of mine. The manga is about a orphaned girl named Himari Momochi who inherits a mansion on her 16th birthday. She soon realizes that things are not always as they seem. Once she gets there, she finds 3 gorgeous squatters who have no intention of leaving her house, which is a gateway between the demon and human world. Two of them (Yukari and Ise) are ayakashi (spirits) and the other is a human named Aoi who can transform into a fox/cat/butterfly demon. Aoi was chosen by the house to be its protector, and that is why he can change shape. The fox demon (Nue) reminds me a lot of Tomoe from Kamasama Kiss at least in looks (though a little more effeminate), though he and his alter ego are way nicer to start out with, and even features similar characters from that manga/anime.

Naturally Himari immediately falls for Aoi and is constantly talking about him and being concerned for his well-being. The funniest parts were how flustered she gets around him because he seems to be so naive, which makes me wonder how long he’s been the house protector. I look forward to finding out more about both of their characters and the mansion to better fill out the story. Recommended for ages 14+, 4 stars.

The Woman Who Would Be King

The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt by Kara Cooney

Hatshepsut's Cartouche

I’ve been wanting to read this for awhile, and so when I was browsing for a new audiobook to read, I grabbed for this one. This book was a very intriguing glimpse into the Egyptian royal family in the Eighteenth Dynasty, religion/mythology, and culture. I figured that naturally a pharaoh’s wife/daughter would be involved in religious ceremonies, but I had never heard of her duties as “god’s wife of Amun”, or that it would be so sexual. It was a bit odd to think about the Egyptians believing that the world was started by a god masturbating. The intricacies of palace life are a bit over my head, but I know that I would not have wanted to be a royal woman in Egyptian times as their lives were so rigid and controlled.

The book goes into great detail about Hatshepsut’s father Thutmose I, who was not the original successor to the throne but most likely a high powered general, and her mother Ahmose (the great wife – chief among all the wives and harem). Hatshepsut herself was married to her half-brother Thutmose II, who was the third in line to the throne originally, but was sickly and died early. She next ended up begin regent to her toddler step-son Thutmose III, and later because she was “intellectually ambitious” seized the chance to be co-king with him. She bought her support with the elites of the kingdom and started an extensive building program, originally started by her father Thutmose I. The co-regency was also a time of great peace and prosperity, as evidenced by her very successive journey to Punt.

Hatshepsut Expediton to Punt

Part of Hatshepsut’s wall painting of the Expedition to Punt from her Mortuary Temple at Deir el Bahri,  Luxor, Egypt

The Mortuary Temple of King Hatshepsut, aka the Djeser-Djeseru, the Holy of Holies

Entrance to Mortuary Temple at Deir el Bahri, Luxor, Egypt. Called Djeser-Djeseru, aka “Holy of Holies” [this is someplace I’ve always wanted to go, even before I read this brilliant biography]

As much as some historians try to claim that she was a ruthless power-grabber who took advantage of a precarious political situation for her own gain, I really think that she was trying to not let her father’s legacy die out and took the opportunity to rule a bit. Yes it was not traditional and she stretched all kind of boundaries, including revamping/re-sexing the gods but it worked for her and her people at the time. And if there was disension in the ranks, so to speak, Thutmose III didn’t speak up about it until he was pretty much full-grown. In fact he didn’t deface or knock-down her sculptures until the very end of his reign, and even then, it seems to be more about a succession issue (putting a son with no royal connections on the throne) than actual contempt of his aunt I think. It’s hard to make an accurate assessment of the time because there was no written record of how others felt about it, instead having to go on a lot of conjecture as the author/historian does in the book. So yeah, she makes a lot of assumptions, but I agreed with most of it. 5 stars.

hatshepsutbust

Seated Hatshepsut statue

Hatshepsut as King with feminine attributes

Kids Cafe Lectures: Ancient Egyptian Art

We’re halfway through the Summer Reading program. I am fairly certain that we are busier this year than last year and with less staff, just to make things interesting. I’ve been keeping track of my son Liam and my summer reading and I’m rather proud of myself. So far I read to him for a bit over 500 minutes (about 8.3 hrs – which is, I think, quite impressive as he’s not quite four and still has a relatively short attention span). I’ve read (books only) about 2400 minutes (40 hrs) and if you were to add audiobooks, it would be about double that time.

This is the second half of my powerpoints on Egypt, this one of course being about Egyptian art. It does overlap a bit with the previous one on Egyptian history, but that is a bit unavoidable.The formatting is a bit off again, not sure why it does that when I paste from Word. For this week’s activity, we made 3-D pyramids out of paper and decorated them. It was a bit tricky to cut out and put together the first time, but once I made one a couple of times, it was easy to show the kids and parents.

Ancient Egyptian Art – Egypt Pt 2

weighing_of_the_heart

The Book of the Dead, The Weighing of the Heart

  • The Egyptian culture lasted for over 3000 years and the art started in c. 2686 BCE, and style was copied throughout its whole history.
  • Most of their art came from their religion and was especially used to glorify the Pharaoh, their king, whom they considered a god. They filled the tombs of their Pharaohs with paintings and sculpture, though nobles also had these kinds of decoration. Temples were another popular place for art. The walls held paintings and there were large sculptures as well.
    • A majority of the art hidden in tombs was stolen by thieves over thousands of years
  • The Style of Egyptian Art
    • Traditional portraiture tries to be as realistic as possible, usually viewed head on, so the subject matter is looking at you
      • In contrast, in Egyptian art –heads were depicted in profile with just one eye visible, but both shoulders were shown facing forwards.
        • Queen Nefertari, wife of Ramses II Queen Nefertari, wife of Ramses II
        • Representations of gods depicted some deities with the heads of humans wearing various styles of crowns and headdresses whilst other gods were depicted as ‘human hybrids’ with the bodies of humans but with the heads of animals.
          • The bodies and heads of seated gods were often depicted entirely in profile. Gods with human like heads were always painted in a brownish-red color and goddesses were always painted in a yellow color.
          • Tomb of Horemheb with Hathor and Horus Tomb of Horemheb and Horus
            • Horemheb was two pharaohs after Tutankhamun
            • Horus the Elder – falcon-headed god, protector and patron of the pharaoh
            • Hathor – sky goddess and goddess of beauty, women and children; symbol was the cow
      • They used Hieratic Scale – assigns importance based on the size in relation to others in the picture
        •  House Altar Depicting Akhenaten, Nefertiti and Their Three Daughtera
          • House Altar of Akhenaton, Nerfertiti and Three Daughters
            • Akhenaton is the biggest figure b/c he’s the pharaoh, then next biggest is Nefertiti b/c she’s the queen, then their three daughters
      • Egyptian Painting and Tomb Walls
        • Paintings were instructional – it taught the people (including the Pharaohs) the path to the underworld, as well as showing what Egyptians did every day and their accomplishments.
        • They mostly used the colors blue, black, red, green, white and yellow in their paintings.
        • Many of the paintings of Ancient Egypt survived for so many thousands of years because of the extremely dry climate of the area.
  • Reliefs
    • A relief is a sculpture that is part of a wall or structure. The Egyptians often carved them into the walls of their temples and tombs. Reliefs were generally painted as well.
    • Painted Relief in Tomb of Merneptah, Valley of the Kings, 1203 BCE
      • Tomb of Merneptah, Valley of the Kings, 1203 BCE (13th son of Ramses II, who ruled after his father died)
    • The Egyptians are most famous for their monumental sculptures.
    • r_seaman@hotmail.com

      r_seaman@hotmail.com

        • Ramses II at Abu Simbel
        • Sphinx
        • Great Sphinx
      • They also did smaller more intricate sculptures, like Tutankhamun’s funerary mask
      •  King Tut Funeral Mask
        • The coloring of the collar is made with semiprecious stones and the stripes on the headdress are made with blue glass called faience. The rest of the mask is made from twenty-four pounds of solid gold!
          • Nefertiti's Head
        • Bust of Nefertiti
          • Nefertiti was the wife of Pharaoh Akhenaton, aka The Heretic King. She had 6 daughters with him. Her name means “The beautiful one has come.”
          • The sculpture was found in the sculptor Thutmose’s studio and is thought to be a 3D model of the queen to be used to make other sculpture.
          • She has been held up as the symbol of beauty for several millenia.
    • Activity: 3-D Pyramids
      •  The tabs are just to make it stand up a little better. They are folded inside the pyramid. Don’t color the square as it will be the inside bottom when folded in to make the pyramids. You can color it anyway you like, but I liked the solid colors or when I made it look like bricks.
      • pyramid
      • 3D Pyramids

About a Girl

About a Girl

About a Girl (Metamorphoses #3) by Sarah McCarry

To be published: July 14, 2015

In the third book of the Metamorphoses series, seventeen-year old Tally (short for Atalanta) has got her life all planned out. She is a genius, beloved by her adopted family and her best friend Shane, and will shortly graduate high school and go to college to get her  Ph.D in cosmology and/or particle physics. That is until one day, while at a friend’s house and she sees a picture of her mother and a famous musician and believes he is the answer to her questions about her mother, who abandoned her shortly after she was born and her as-yet-unknown father. She travels to a small Northwestern town to meet Jack, the musician, and see if he can help her unravel her past. She meets a mysterious young woman named Maddy and falls head over heals in love with her. Will Maddy or Jack be able to help her find the truth about her parents? Read this intriguing new take on a coming-of-age story to find out. Recommended for ages 15+, 3 stars.

If I had known this was the third book in a series, I probably wouldn’t have picked it up. It would’ve helped to read the first book at least, as that mentioned three of the major secondary characters in this volume. First off, I’d like to say that I loved how ordered and scientific Tally was, and even if I didn’t understand all the astronomy she mentions, I could tell how passionate she was about it. Tally’s best friend Shane was an interesting character as he was transgendered, though the author/main character never made a big deal about it, which was a change from other YA books I’ve heard about. I know how hard it is to be in love with your best friend growing up (mine were boys) and not be able to talk about, or express how you feel and how frustrating it can be especially if the person doesn’t return your affections. Then there is the whole mythological undercurrent to the story, which is loosely based on Jason and the Argonauts. This part was a little hard to read, and I could never quite decide if it was some giant trippy episode, some seriously vivid nightmares or actual plot points. Seems it might’ve been all three.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher St Martins Press in exchange for my honest review.