The Other Side of the Gate

The Other Side of the Gate

The Other Side of the Gate (Into the Realms #1) by Craig Michael Curtis

Published: July 28, 2009

Fourteen year old Daniel Weaver arrives in a strange new world called the Realms one night by boat. He doesn’t know where he is or how he got there. He is not the first human to come there, nor will he be the last. He meets a local girl named Eleanor,  and together decide to travel through the sixteen Gates of the Realms on a “forward quest” in order to find out the truth about why humans have been coming to the Realms. Come explore the world of the Realms, and join Daniel and Eleanor as they begin their epic coming of age quest. Recommended for ages 14+, 4 stars. 

First I will discuss the things I didn’t like about the book. There were some obvious spelling errors and typos. The two spaces at the end of each sentence bothered me in the beginning, but I didn’t care so much about by the end of the book, probably because I got used to it. The biggest issue with the book, in my opinion, was the way the story dragged in the middle and end, and I felt like it could’ve been edited down a bit to help with that problem. 

On to the good stuff. I really liked the world-building in this book. I also liked the idea of getting a “Realm gift” from the prime-numbered Realms and a “power word,” which gives you another superhero-like power. The main character is transported to an unknown world and must survive by his wits and skills. He is good at helping people and encouraging them. Daniel meets Eleanor in a bit of an odd way, but they hit it off right away. I love both of these characters, and they really compliment each other. Their awkwardness as they start to fall for each other is adorable, the boy is a bit clueless and the girl is more forward (just like it usually goes in real life, at least in my experience). My favorite characters were the soul-bound couple, the Butterfields, because of the way they interact with each other – just like an old married couple even though they’re not. The most surprising character that I enjoyed reading about was Oka, the curmudgeon would-be wizard, who reluctantly helps Daniel and Eleanor at the end of the book. My favorite scene was probably the static electricity scene at the end of the book with the ghosts (can’t go into more or it will ruin it for everyone else). 

The end of the book especially had a Wizard of Oz theme to it, which I enjoyed as L. Frank Baum is one of my favorite authors. Think about the story summary: Two, and eventually four, teenagers go on a quest to seek knowledge and the help of a wizard. They finally find their wizard, who is actually not one (just like in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz), and is conveniently named Harry Baum. Daniel doesn’t exactly find the answers he is looking for in the Fourth Realm with his “magician” and so needs to continue all the way to the end to find his reason for being in the Realms. 

Bottom line for this book, and the series in general: Yes it is a long book but well worth a read and I personally am excited to see what he does with the next book in the five book series. 

Disclaimer: I did receive a copy of this book from the author in exchange for my honest review. 

 

Heroine Worship

Heroine Worship

Heroine Worship (Heroine Complex #2) by Sarah Kuhn

Published July 4, 2017

Aveda Jupiter, badass superheroine extraordinaire, is bored. Ever since she and her best friend (and former personal assistant) fire-wielder Evie Tanaka stopped a demon invasion four months earlier, Ms. Jupiter (aka Annie Chang) has been frustrated with the lack of opportunities for superheroine intervention in San Francisco, but also because no one takes her seriously and everyone thinks she is just a attention-hogging diva. She wants to be an exemplary best friend to Evie, and so when Evie gets engaged and asks her to be the maid of honor, she takes her job very seriously. Things finally start happening with Scott, the mage who works with her company, and Annie has been in love with him forever. Only the damn demons seem to keep getting in the way of everything. Can Evie and Aveda set aside their difference and work together to defeat these demons? 3-1/2 stars. 

This book draggggggggged a lot, especially in the middle. I kept waiting for the plot to progress and it did eventually, but took its sweet time to get there. If I didn’t like the characters so much, I probably wouldn’t have finished it. The first book in the series, Heroine Complex, was entirely from the viewpoint of Evie and I really sympathized with her for having deal with someone who never appreciated her and what she did for her boss/friend. This book is entirely from Annie/Aveda’s viewpoint, which is completely different. We find out pretty early on that Annie is not the overly-confident diva that she originally appears but is completely vulnerable and emotional, especially after she realizes what a complete b**** she’s been to her best friend over the years. Then there’s Scott, the mage she’s known for years who she has had a crush on since she was twelve years old, and who has only recently started acting like a normal human being with her. I loved the interaction between the two of them and how shy they were as they got to know each other again, properly this time. 

Disclaimer: I received this book, from Berkley Publishing Group via Netgalley, in exchange for my honest review. 

 

The Waking Land

The Waking Land

The Waking Land  by Callie Bates

To be published: June 27, 2017

Lady Elanna Valtai (El for short) was kidnapped at age five by the King of Ereni because of her father’s political connections and designs. She is raised as the adopted daugher in King Antoine’s court but never fits in because everyone thinks her family are traitors. Fourteen years pass and El has cut all ties to her family and considers herself Ereni. That is until the King is mysteriously murdered, and she is blamed for it. She escapes with the help of a mysterious young man with magical abilities named Lord Jahan and his party of Caerisi supporters. She soon has to deal with her parents that abandoned her so long ago, and the semi-dormant nature magic she has been keeping secret for years. Magic is forbidden and is punishable by death. Will El be able to lead the rebellion that will determine her destiny and possibly her future love? Recommended for ages 14+, 4-1/2 stars. 

I adored this book! The world-building was great and the author really did manage to create a rich detailed novel. El could be a spoiled princess who cares about nobody but herself (like her adopted sister Loyce), but she is way more than that. This is especially true after she realizes all that is going on her around her – i.e. her role in the political machinations of her father and the kingdom of Ereni. Eren reminded me of late medieval/early Renaissance England, while Caeris reminded me a lot of Scotland with a splash of Ireland, and a little bit of Diana Gabaldon with the magic stones and power of the earth element of the story. I loved the El and Jahan story! Finn totally reminded me of Leith from the TV show Reign, in fact the actor is who I picture in my head whenever I read about him. He’s got that whole innocent caught in the middle vibe, especially in regard to being the next king, and I do feel a little bad for him as he’s seems to have feelings for El. That marriage to the land scene at the end of the book…wow is all I can say.

There were two things I didn’t like about this book. The first was that the story dragged a bit in the beginning and end, which dragged the story out unnecessarily, and made it hard to get into and then I was praying for it to hurry up and end. Second, there was not enough background information on one of my favorite characters besides El, Jahan Korakides. Seriously, he’s El’s love interest and all you know are some vague details about the guy and he’s the most interesting character because he’s a sorcerer who completely hides this fact and manages to live amongst royalty. 

 

Best Books I read in 2016

I am so glad 2016 is over! Though I didn’t read as many books as 2015 (mostly because a lot of what I read was fan-fiction, which I love, but doesn’t count towards my reading goals for the year), I still read a decent amount of good books (232 total). I read a ton of mangas (71 – impressive when you think they’re about 2oo pgs each) and there were a lot of really good ones there. This is the first year I’ve had a separate category for mangas on my end of the year list. The theme for this year appears to have been romances, though not intentionally, mostly just because of issues in my personal life reflecting into what I chose to read. 

Picture Books

jack-frost

  • Jack Frost (Guardians of Childhood #3) by William Joyce – I love William Joyce’s books and this one was a visual masterpiece. I love the Guardians of Childhood series and this is graphically amazing younger children’s version before he brings out the full-on book for the chapter book series. A new interpretation of the Jack Frost myth, and it is this book whose story was featured on The Rise of the Guardians movie that came out in 2013. 
  • I Love You Already by Jory John – brought to you by the same guy that did Goodnight Already!, which I adored. Hilarious sequel about Bear and his neighbor Duck, who annoys the crap out of him but who he still likes. Reminds me of parents and kids. 
  • mother-bruce-spread-liams-favorites-copy
  • Mother Bruce written/illustrated by Ryan T. Higgins – funniest book I read this year, hands down. Goose baby-wearing by a grumpy bear, enough said. 
  • It Came in the Mail written/illustrated by Ben Clanton – Picked it up after discovering his other adorable comic, Narwhal and Jelly (described below). An adorable book and very imaginative. A little boy, aptly named Liam (like my son), wants desperately to get something in the mail. So he writes a nice little note to the mailbox begging for something and gets a surprise, a dragon in the mail. So he asks for more and chaos ensues, but he comes up with a clever solution.

Children

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  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson – I read this for our tween book club and really enjoyed it, but it is a 337 page verse novel, which can kind of be scary for some kids. It is an autobiographic poem essentially about the author. 
  • The Creeping Shadow (Lockwood & Co. #4) by Jonathan Stroud – I love pretty much anything this man writes, but this one was a great continuation of the Lockwood & Co series. I have described this as “Ghost epidemic in the UK with kids as ghost hunters but the ghosts can actually kill you, and only kids can see them”. Glad Lucy finally got back with Lockwood, George and Holly. 
  • funny-bones
  • Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras by Duncan Tonatiuh – tells the story of one of the most famous Mexican illustrators who created a lot of the images we know today about Dia de los Muertos (one of my favorite holidays, along with Halloween)
  • The Noisy Paint Box by Barb Rosenstock – a wonderfully creative biography of abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky, whom I discovered last year, who could hear colors and see sounds
  • Narwal: Unicorn of the Sea (Narwhal and Jelly #1)  written and illustrated by Ben Clanton – a recent discovery that was too cute for words. How can you not love a Narwhal and Jellyfish who love waffles, imagination, reading, and creating their own unique pod full of friends?
  • the-marvels
  • The Marvels by Brian Selznick – this one had been on my to-read list for ages and finally got read it. It is a masterpiece like pretty much all of his work, which he writes and illustrates. Everyone should read this. The book, which starts in 1766 and ends in 2007, is about the Marvel and Nightingale families and their connection to each other. But it is also a story about love in all its forms, acceptance, understanding, and the complicated relationships within families (which really hit home for me this year). 
  • a-new-hope-the-princess-the-scoundrel-and-the-farm-boy
  • A New Hope – The Princess, The Scoundrel and the Farm Boy by Alexandra Bracken – picked this one up as a way to get my son who loves Star Wars more into audiobooks. I loved it, more than him. It had all the cool sound effects, a lot of the movie dialogue, and a whole backstory on Princess Leia, Han Solo, and Luke Skywalker. Am definitely listening to the other two adaptations. Highly recommended as an audiobook, though more suited to 9-14 yr olds than 5 yr olds.

Young Adult

  • The Lunar Chronicles (Cinder, Scarlett, Cress, and Winterby Marisa Meyers – probably the best series I’ve read in a while. I love fairy-tale retellings and this one is an awesome sci-fi version with cyborgs, genetically-engineered wolfmen, space pilots, and psychotic Lunars (as the name suggests, people from the Moon). Plus the romances are fantastic and varied. 
  • fangirlcarry-on-book-collage
  • Fangirl and Carry On by Rainbow Rowell – definitely two of the absolute best books I read this year. I adore all the stuff I’ve read so far from this author, and look forward to reading more in the future. You should read Fangirl first and then Carry On, though they can both stand on their own, as Carry On is literally a big part of the first book. I was totally Cather Avery and wished I could find someone like Levi. Sigh…

Manga see this post for reviews for most of them

  • Kamisama Kiss Vol 20 – 22 by Julieta Suzuki – I love this series, so anymore books I get to read are awesome. See my initial reviews of the series here. 
  • A Silent Voice Vol 1-7 by Yoshitoki Oima – I have never read a manga about bullying, esp as it was about a deaf girl, and that is what drew me to this book. It really was unlike anything I’d ever read and was a very unconventional romance. 
  • wolf-children2
  • Wolf Children: Ame and Yuki by Mamoru Hosoda – another unconventional fantasy romance (seems to be the year for them) about a half wolf/half man who meets the love of his life and their children. Great anime as well. 
  • Library Wars Vol 14
  • Library Wars Vol. 14- by Kiiro Yumi – I love the craziness of this manga. I love the ideas of a militarized librarians protecting censorship. 
  • Ouran High School Host Club, Vol 1-11 by Bisco Hatori – loved the anime so decided to read the books to see if there was any extra awesome and there is. 
  • Kimi Ni Todoke (From Me to You), Vol 1-25  by Karuho Shiina – This is one of the sweetest mangas, heck romances, I’ve read in awhile. I can identify
  • Demon Love Spell, Vol 1-6 by Mayu Shinjo – the most ridiculous idea and worst name ever for a manga, but it made me LOL and keep reading till I finished the series. 
  • miyamura
  • Horimiya Vol 1-5 by Hero – another great manga romance series on an unconventional topic; Two high school students, who are not all they seem, fall in love and start a relationship. They are seriously the cutest, most awkward couple ever, which makes it so fun to watch the story unfold. 

Adult

  • The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick – an ARC (Advanced Readers Copy) I picked up because it reminded me a bit of Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson (another awesome aging adult book). It was a bit of a romance, journey to lead you to new discoveries – i.e. your self after a traumatic event, in this case the death of Arthur’s beloved wife. 
  • The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah – read this one for my bookclub and just loved the story of two very different sisters in the French Resistance during WWII
  • Dragon Age: MageKiller (Magekiller #1-6) – An ARC I was lucky enough to review this year, I want to read the whole series now. 
  • The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende – I’ve loved her books for years and so gladly picked this for my bookclub and enjoyed it as well
  • Poison or Protect: Delightfully Deadly #1 and Imprudence (Custard Protocols #2) by Gail Carriger – 1st one is a novella about one of her characters from the Finishing School series, which was a fun little romp. 2nd one is all about her dad going crazy, a bit of sex education, and the crap really hitting the fan in regards to the G0d-breaker Plague (a continuation of events that happened in her first series, my favorite The Parasol Protectorate).
  • The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman (The Saxon Stories #1-2) by Bernard Cornwell – fabulous series, that they also turned into a miniseries, about life in King Alfred the Great’s court. It is set in the 9th century and told from the viewpoint of a young boy raised by the Vikings who is actually a Saxon lord. Very much looking forward to reading more books in this series

Snow White: A Graphic Novel

snow-white-a-graphic-novel

Snow White: A Graphic Novel written and illustrated by Matt Phelan

Published: Sept 13, 2016

Using watercolor in the Art Deco and film noir style, Matt Phelan introduces us to a fresh take on the Snow White and the Seven Dwarves story. After Samantha White’s (aka Snow) mother dies of tuberculosis in the 1920s in NYC, Snow and her father are heartbroken. Ten years, her father, “The King of Wall Street” is lonely and discovers that the “Queen of the Ziegfeld Follies” is performing on Broadway. He is captivated with her elegant style and bobbed hair and promptly marries her. The Queen is not pleased that Snow is around and promptly sends her to boarding school in the country. She soon gets rid of her husband, but he still gets the last laugh, which she discovers during the reading of the will. Her husband has gone behind her back and left Snow three-quarters of the estate. The Queen is furious and vows revenge by getting rid of Snow, but the Huntsman spares her. She is rescued by the Seven, a group of street children that adopt her and try to protect her, though she still falls to the Queen’s poisoned apple. The Seven put her in a glass cage. Will she be rescued by her Prince Charming and live happily ever after? To find out, read this charming version of Snow White. Recommended for ages 10+, 4 stars. 

I was honestly not a fan of the artwork until I learned more about it from the author, via this interview. I liked that he not only loved the Disney Snow White version (one of my personal favorites), but also enjoyed film noir movies such as Citizen Kane and the Thin Man movies (which I also enjoy) and these influenced how he created the graphic novel. I really loved the story line and the twist on the classic tale. The Ziegfeld Follies were always cool to see on movies from the 1920s and 1930s, and they must have been spectacular in real life, so yeah I can see how the King would be dazzled after seeing the Queen of the Follies dancing so glamorous and looking like a real stunner on stage. I liked that the Seven were a group of abandoned street kids because in a way, they are kind of like Snow, forced to fend for themselves even though they’ve definitely gotten a more rotten deal. I also liked that they made the Prince a working detective instead of a superficial pretty boy. 

Summer Manga

This summer has been cray-cray! So much work and programming and personal life has been all over the place. So I have been reading a good amount of manga (29 and counting since end of April) this summer in between all the ARCs and book club reads because A. I enjoy them B. they are quick reads C. sometimes you just need something fluffy to read in between all the other stuff. I have discovered some pretty good stuff by accident, though some I knew about because of watching the anime version. I was very surprised how deep and meaningful A Silent Voice ended up being, and it is definitely one of the best mangas I’ve read this year. I’ve read more than I have reviewed, but I’ve been writing this post forever, so I figured I should end it soon. 

Strobe Edge Vol 1

Strobe Edge, Vol 1. written and illustrated by Io Sakisaka

Honestly at first I thought this book was a bit shallow and the main character clueless, but I will admit that is a bit of the charm of the book. Ninako has always relied on others to tell how she was feeling and has always been very nice but naive, which is why when she falls for the quiet popular guy Ren, she doesn’t know how to react. She wasn’t expecting it and most of her interactions with him are purely by luck and circumstance, but both of them seem to be falling in love with each other in a most unexpected way. Of course, there is another boy named Daichi who is in love with her, and they have been friends for years, but won’t say anything except to get pissed at Ren for “taking her away” from him. The twist in this story comes from the fact that Ren is dating Daichi’s older sister and his family has been going through a messy divorce. Will she bow to her friend’s pressure to date Daishi or follow her heart (though possibly have it broken) by pursuing Ren? Recommended for ages 13+, 3 stars. 

A Silent Voice #1 -2 by Yoshitoki Oima

A-Silent-Voice-Koe-no-Katachi-Volume-2

Shoya Ishida is a bit of a ruffian and slacker. He is in 6th grade and with the help of his two buddies, they make a new girl’s life a living hell. Shoko Nishimiya is the object of his torture, a pretty deaf girl who thinks the best of everyone, even in the midst of being harangued constantly by Shoya. He ends up ruining six of Shoko’s hearing aids before her mother draws her out of school, and charges his mother for the replacement of them, all $17,000 worth. Because of what he did, Shoya is ostracized for the next 6 years by his classmates and supposed friends and becomes an outcast. He makes up his mind to find Shoko and apologize to her in person, after he has paid back his mother all the money he owes her. He finally meets her and instead of simply apologizing, he tries to become her friend. She is at first bewildered by this, but kind of accepts it at the same time. He does seem like he’s turned over a new leaf, paying his mom back for the money he owes her, trying to help Shoko out, and learning sign language so they can communicate. Her sister Yuzuru is very protective of her and at first pretends to be her boyfriend to scare off Shoya (which leads to a hilarious scene in a public bath later on). In the end, Yuzuru decides that he is not being false and is sincerely trying to make amends. Their mother, however, will never forgive him. Will Shoya ever be able to get her mother’s forgiveness? What is his end game? How does Shoko really feel about him? To find out, read the first two volumes of this delightful series. Highly recommended for ages 13+, 5 stars. 

I forget what I was browsing when I discovered this title, but I’m glad I picked it up. The subject matter was so interesting and one I’ve never seen in mangas before, at least in this context. This handled some pretty tough topics such as bullying, depression, and thoughts of suicide, with a light touch. By that, I mean we are clearly shown the cause of the main character’s issues and the effect it had on his life afterwards (without being heavy-handed). I have dealt with all three of those in the past and been on both sides of bullying and I thought it was written very well. I think my favorite part had to be his mother’s reaction to finding out that he planned to end his life (as a mother, I can understand her reaction). 

Demon Love Spell

Demon Love Spell (Ayakashi Koi Emaki), Vol. 1-4 written and illustrated by Manyu Shinjo

This is quite possibly one of the worst name for a manga or anime, or really a book period. However, the story really wasn’t that bad. A good girl falling in love for a bad boy is not a new story, but watching her crumble was entertaining. Definitely a 16+ book though, as there are fairly graphic depiction of nudity and simulations of sex.

Miko Tsubaki is daughter of the head priest of the local shrine and her father is a famous demon hunter. She is supposed to be following in this footsteps, but her powers aren’t as good. One day she seals the powers of an incredibly powerful incubus (who seduces women into having sex with them to gain their power or energy) named Kagura, totally by accident, and they start living together. He is in a much different form though, not the sex god form she originally encounters but a mini boy child version (which makes for some interesting scenes). Eventually, Kagura proposes marriage to her and she says yes, only they have to convince both of their families it is a good idea. 

Volume 4 was my favorite one of the series because it made me laugh out loud so much I must’ve seemed like a crazy person.The series as a whole has been pretty hilarious as the incubus tries to get Miko, a priestess, to have sex with him so he can become even more powerful as a demon. But this volume is more stepped up as they are both falling more in love with each other and Miko’s resistance is falling fast. Plus every time she works up the courage to actually do it, they are interrupted by a crazy situation, aka the body swapping in this book.  Recommended for ages 16+, 4 stars. 

Wolf Children Ame and Yuki

Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki written by Mamoru Hosoda, illustrated by Yu and Yoshiyuki Sadamoto

I love love loved this book! It was a bit of a random pickup after I saw the book on a comics involving mothers booklist and thought it looked like fun. It was sweet and sad and wonderful! Plus fabulous illustrations that were so expressive. Hana is a young woman at university in a biology class when she meets a handsome but quiet young man and shares her textbook with him. They quickly fall in love, even after he reveals that he is half-wolf and can change at will. They soon have a baby girl named Yuki, followed a year later by a boy named Ame. Her husband has a tragic accident and dies, leaving young mother Hana to take care of two children by herself. She decides they would be able to be more themselves, aka half-wolf children, if they lived out in the country where her husband grew up. So they move way out and have to fend for themselves, learning to garden and be a part of nature. Her children are very different as they decide whether they want to be human or wolf on their own. Parts of this manga made me sob and it was totally heart-wrenching, but hopeful in the end. The anime version is great as well. Highly recommended for ages 15+, 5 stars.

Library Wars Vol 14

Library Wars: Love & War, Vol 14 written and illustrated by Kiiro Yumi

The Library Task Force (LTF) is still protecting the author Mr. Toma from the Media Betterment Committee guys aka the bad guys who want censorship, but decide he must defect from Japan to protect himself.  Kasahara and Instructor Dojo are helping Toma escape, but Dojo is injured and Kasahara must protect both of them from the MBC. Kasahara picks him up and takes him to safety. It finally happened! Kasahara finally got up the nerve to kiss Instructor Dojo after he is injured and tell him she likes him. He is shocked to say the least, but can still smirk at her as she is leaving. The LTF figured out that their mole was none other than Assistant Director Hatano and not Tezuka’s brother Satoshi. Dojo manages to make it a hospital where he has surgery to remove the bullet from his leg, and Kasahara drives Toma to Osaka. I liked it at the end of the manga when the LTF team members are discussing how similar Kasahara and Dojo are, and how Dojo used to be just like Kasahara when he first started. Highly recommended for ages 13+, 5 stars. 

Kimi Ni Todoke - From Me to You manga

Kimi ni Todoke (From Me to You), Vol 1- 10 written and illustrated by Karuho Shiina

I adore this series! I discovered the anime on Hulu and binge-watched it until the end, completely obsessed with it. So when I discovered there was also a manga, I jumped at the chance to read it. I am enjoying it because there is so much more in the manga that you don’t get in the anime show. Volume 1 is so adorable and I loved how the author/illustrator showed how Kazehaya was falling for her so early in the series instead of a bit later like they show in the anime. I mean he was nice to hear from the beginning but you don’t really see the love till later. Volume 1 is all about introducing us to the main characters and Sawako’s first year (1 of 3 years of Japanese high school). Sawako, who the teens have all dubbed Sadako (the long dark haired girl from the horror movie The Ring) because her behavior and mannerisms look the same, is a very quiet and shy girl with no friends. After a chance meeting with Kazehaya before school starts, she starts to slowly come out of her shell and try to get to know and befriend her classmates. They begin to see how cool she is and fun to be around. She becomes friends with Ayane and Chizuru, two girls who are the total opposite of her but soon become fiercely protective of each other. Because she is friends with Chizuru, she also befriends Ryu, Chizuru’s best friend (who is also secretly in love with her). With Kazehaya’s help, she is befriending more classmates and becoming well-liked with pretty much everyone, except Kurumi (who declares them rivals after she is rejected by Kazehaya). Then comes the incredibly slow burn romance between Sawako and Kazehaya culminating in a very awkward pronouncement from both of them that they like each other and start a relationship. I loved Ryu’s character even more in the manga, especially in relation to Chizuru. I can totally relate to Sawako as I was very shy in high school. Looking forward to reading more volumes in the series as this is pretty much where the anime stopped and I know there is at least 15 more volumes after that. Highly recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars. 

Kamisama Kiss Vol 20

Kamisama Kiss Vol. 20 written and illustrated by Julietta Suzuki

Namami and Tomoe are finally dating and they are in Okinawa for Nanami’s class trip. Mikage sends Tomoe on an errand to drop off a gift to the shrine maiden on an island nearby and Tomoe realizes it’s the same one he met so about 100 years ago. She tells him “the girl who lives in your heart is a good one,” and “you need to change if you want to make that girl happy.” He assumes that it means he must become human and starts reading up on it, but it really freaks Nanami out. Tomoe is kind of realizing how hard it will be to be a demon and have a human girlfriend, and she thinks he is rushing his decision to become human. Nanami goes to discuss things with Mikage who tries to make her see things through Tomoe’s eyes. Tomoe eventually takes the re-evolution potion that Kurama got from Ami (to turn her back to human after she was turned into a mermaid in the previous volume), and turns into a small white fox and then is stuck like that. Will he be able to turn back into a demon or even a human? To find out, read this exciting volume. Recommended for ages 14+, 5 stars. 

Demon Prince of Momochi House Vol 1     The Demon Prince of Momochi House

The Demon Prince of Momochi House, Vol 1-2 by Aya Shouoto

A fellow librarian recommended this series to me, so I decided to give it a try. I mean how can I not with a fox demon guy on the cover? They are a particular weakness of mine. The manga is about a orphaned girl named Himari Momochi who inherits a mansion on her 16th birthday. She soon realizes that things are not always as they seem. Once she gets there, she finds 3 gorgeous squatters who have no intention of leaving her house, which is a gateway between the demon and human world. Two of them (Yukari and Ise) are ayakashi (spirits) and the other is a human named Aoi who can transform into a fox/cat/butterfly demon. Aoi was chosen by the house to be its protector, and that is why he can change shape. The fox demon (Nue) reminds me a lot of Tomoe from Kamasama Kiss at least in looks (though a little more effeminate), though he and his alter ego are way nicer to start out with, and even features similar characters from that manga/anime.

Naturally Himari immediately falls for Aoi and is constantly talking about him and being concerned for his well-being. The funniest parts were how flustered she gets around him because he seems to be so naive, which makes me wonder how long he’s been the house protector. I look forward to finding out more about both of their characters and the mansion to better fill out the story. Recommended for ages 14+, 4 stars.

Dragon Age: Magekiller

DA - Magekiller

Dragon Age: Magekiller (Dragon Age: Magekiller #1-6) written by Greg Rucka, Front Cover Art by Sachin Teng, Pencils by Carmen Carnero, Inks by Terry Pallot, Colors by Michael Atiyeh, and Lettering by Michael Heisler

To be published: August 9, 2016

Tessa and Marius are mage killers, and we see the evidence of their handiwork in the first couple of pages after a mage turns into an abomination and tries to kill them. They escape, only to be tailed to their hideout by an elven slave coming to ask their help for his Tevinter magister master. Marius immediately turns it down, as he himself was a former slave and wants to have nothing to do with them. The elf convinces them to come and they do, only discover that the magister is not just another mage, but the Archon himself (the equivalent of ruler in the Tevinter Imperium). He wants Marius and Tessa to get rid of four Venatori agents who are aiming for Tevinter to be restored to the way it was 200 years ago, in the “glory days” of the Imperium. The mage killers make short work of their targets, until it comes to the last one. Marius knew the woman from his past, and won’t kill her. In the end,  she helps Tessa and him escape from the Archon.

Shortly after their escape attempt, the Breach opens up in the sky and rifts start forming and spewing out all manner of things. So not only are they fighting the Archon’s assassins, but also demons. After a big battle that saved a few farmsteads worth of people and going back to the closest town to recuperate, a mysterious woman comes in and Tessa is sure that she is an assassin sent by the Archon. Charter, an elf, turns out to be a scout sent by the Inquisition (the soldiers and other people banding together to seal rifts and get rid of demons and other baddies), asking them to join the cause. Tessa and Marius join the Inquisition and they are sent to the Western Approach to get rid of the Venatori in the area. They are joined by Dorian Pavus, a Tevinter mage and the Chargers, led by Krem. They manage to rescue all of the slaves captured by the Venatori and destroy the camp before returning to Caer Bronach in Crestwood to recover when they run into Leliana, spymaster of the Inquisition, and are summoned to the headquarters at Skyhold. They find themselves thrown into the final battle with Corypheus at the remains of the Temple of Sacred Ashes as reinforcements for the Inquisitor. Can everyone work together to save the world from evil? To find out, read this exciting comic. 4 stars. 

I am a huge Dragon Age fan, so when I found out that this comic was coming out, I jumped at the chance to review a copy. So my review will probably be a bit more detailed than most people because I recognize most of the locales in the comic, even if they aren’t labeled. This blog post will illuminate that further. This is a cool comic because not only does it feature the freaking Archon, a character only hinted at in-game, but also because timeline-wise, it is situated between Dragon Age 2 and Inquisition. So you get to see the Breach and the rifts from an outside character in Thedas. While I really enjoyed the comic, I can see how someone who is not versed in the Dragon Age universe would get very lost. There are a lot of unexplained parts and storylines that just stop or end awkwardly. Maybe a preface with a map and a brief description of Thedas would be a good way to ease people into the story. 

Tessa reminds me a lot of Cassandra, and not just because they are both from noble families in Nevarra. They are both strong, determined women who do what they have to in order to survive. I absolutely adored how Greg Rucka managed to sneak in a copy of Varric’s Swords and Shields as choice reading material for Tessa and Marius, it made me laugh! My favorite parts were when the “assassin” comes to kill Tessa and Marius in the town after they defeat the demons and Tessa begs her to come back tomorrow morning as they are both too tired and the assassin says “There are no such thing nice assassins.” Followed shortly thereafter when they both have daggers to each other’s throats and instead of making a move to strike, they count to three and both take a sip of beer. And of course, they had to bring in my favorite mage, Dorian to make things more snarky (yay I love Dorian!). Plus you get more time with all the interesting characters from Bull’s Chargers. 

Disclaimer: I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this comic, from Edelweiss via Dark Horse Comics, in exchange for my honest review.