Kids Cafe Art Lectures: Mosaics

It was nice to have a little downtime after the busyness of summer, but now we’re starting up Fall programs. I am presenting my first Tween Book Club on Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins on the 24th and I still need to re-read it. But now I have co-worker to help me out, so that should make it a lot easier. I just hope I get some kids to show up for the program. It’s been posted in the Children’s Area for about a week, and I dropped off a bunch of flyers yesterday at an elementary/middle school, and I’m hoping to catch the homeschool group this week to give them some flyers (we have a writing group that meets in our Makerspace once a week). I’m still assigned to DiscoveryTimes (basically Preschool storytime + Science or STEM), so those should be getting a bit easier. I say this because I hadn’t done these storytimes since November 2014 before I started again 3 weeks ago, and it is slightly different than ToddlerTime in that there is more planning and you usually do an activity/experiment during the storytime or I like to make up a Take-Home sheet so they can continue the lesson at home.

Anyways, on to Kids Cafe. I rather enjoyed doing this lecture as it taught me some stuff I didn’t know,  like the differences between Greek and Roman mosaics. Plus the Roman mosaics are so detailed that it really does look like a painting. The thing I loved most about this lecture was the art project, which I had a lot of fun with, though it was a lot harder to do than I thought it would be. I originally wanted to do bean mosaics, but we didn’t have any at work and I didn’t want to use dried pasta as we only had mini penne and farfalle. So I came up with using pony beads, the largish beads that are easier for little kids to grab, and white posterboard circles that I had leftover from last summer’s summer reading theme (space). The only problem with this was that you had to completely make sure the glue had dried or the beads would fall off.

KC Mosaics – April 24

Paper Sea Mosaic

Paper Sea Mosaic

  • What is a mosaic?
    • A mosaic is a picture or pattern produced by arranging together small colored pieces of hard material, such as stone, tile, or glass.
    • Mosaic Rock
    • Garden Mushrooms Mosaics
  • Early Beginnings of Mosaics
    • Artists have been creating mosaics since around 700 BCE (for over 2700 years). In the beginning, they used different colored stones to create patterns,
    • It was the Greeks, in 300 BCE, who raised the pebble technique to an art form, with precise geometric patterns and detailed scenes of people and animals.
    • Ex. Lion Hunt Greek Pebble Mosaic – 300 BCE
    • Lion Hunt Greek Pebble Mosaic, 300 BCE
  • Roman Mosaics (200 BCE – 450 CE)
    • By 200 BCE, specially manufactured pieces (“tesserae”) were being used to give extra detail and range of color to the work. Using small tesserae, this meant that mosaics could imitate paintings. Many of the mosaics preserved at Pompeii were the work of Greek artists.
    • Ex. Alexander mosaic from Pompeii – Alexander and Darius at Battle of Issus, Pompeii – 100 BCE
    • Alexander and Darius at Battle of Issus, Pompeii - 100 BCE
    • Ex. Close-up of Alexander Mosaic
    • Battle of Alexander mosaic from Pompeii
  • Roman Britain (43-409 CE)
    • The expansion of the Roman Empire took mosaics further afield, although the level of skill and artistry was diluted. If you compare mosaics from Roman Britain with Italian ones you will notice that the British examples are simpler in design and less accomplished in technique.
    • Ex. Roman Townhouse Mosaic in Dorset, England. c. 300
    • Roman Britain townhousefloor
    • Ex. Detail of Stones Used
    • tesserae detail of townhouse floor
  • Byzantine Empire (400-1453 CE)
    • With the rise of the Byzantine Empire from the 5th century onwards, centered on Byzantium (now Istanbul, Turkey), the art form took on new characteristics. These included Eastern influences in and gold or silver leaf on top.
    • Ex. Virgin and Child with Justinian I and Constantine I at Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey – c. 900s
    • Mosaïques de l'entrée sud-ouest de Sainte-Sophie (Istanbul, Turquie)
    • Christ Enthroned at Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy – c. 500s
    • Basilica of San Vitale - Christ Enthroned, 547 CE
  • Islamic Influences in Spain (711-1492 CE)
    • In the west of Europe, the Moors brought Islamic mosaic and tile art into the Iberian Peninsula in the 8th century. It was not pictorial, but was very geometric.
    • Ex. Tile mosaics from Alhambra Palace, Granada, Spain – 1400
    • Islamic Tile Mosaic at Alhambra Palace - Granada, Spain - 1400s CE      Islamic Tile mosaic at Alhambra Palace - Granada, Spain
  • Decline in Europe but revival in Mesoamerica
    • Mosaics went into decline in the Middle Ages in Europe
    • Mesoamerican (Mexico and some of Central America) art used mosaics, especially the Aztecs (c. 1195-1522 CE)
    • Ex. Double Headed Serpent (Quetzalcoatl) chest decoration, Aztec – 1400s
    • Aztec Double headed mosaic Serpent chestpiece - 15-16th centuries AD
  • 19th Century Revival
    • Mosaics had a major revival in 19th Century, esp in public spaces and cathedrals like Westminster Abbey in London and Sacre Coeur, Paris.
    • Pulpit in Westminster Cathedral, London – 1800s
    • Pulpit in Westminster Cathedral - 19th Century
    • Close-up of Pulpit Column
    • Closeup of pulpit
  • Art Noveau (1884-1910)
    • The Art Nouveau movement also embraced mosaic art. From 1900-1914, in Barcelona, Spain, Antoni Gaudi helped produce the stunning ceramic mosaics of Guell Park
    • Guell Park Benches, 1900-14
    • Antonio Gaudi - Guell Park benches,
    • Material taken from: http://www.thejoyofshards.co.uk/history/
  • Modern Mosaics
  • Activity: Bead Mosaics
    • This was harder than I thought it would be mostly because the beads were round and it’s hard to make geometric-style patterns, aka copies of the ones from Alhambra Palace, because they are meant for point-edged tesserae
    • Islamic Tile Mosaic at Alhambra Palace - Granada, Spain - 1400s CE   –> I used this one as the basic design of my mosaic, but again, hard to completely duplicate due to round nature of beads
    • Bead Mosaic example

 

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